Can You Solve Your Candle Problem?

In 1945, psychologist Karl Duncker’s cognitive performance test – The Candle Problem – was published as a task designed to measure the influence of functional fixedness [rigid rules & regulations] on a participant’s problem solving capabilities.

The participant is provided with a table placed up against a wall, a candle, and a book of matches and a box of wall tacks. Using these items the participant is then asked to secure the candle to the wall, light it and ensure that none of the wax drops on the table below.

Before scrolling down — see if you can come up with a solution to the candle problem.

On the surface this problem is packaged like many of the issues we face as leaders on a day to day basis: We are given a set of resources designed to solve a dated problem or designed to function in a manner that is not right-fitted to our specific needs. This consequently, leads most to believe that the problems that arise in a fast paced competitive work environment are insurmountable.

How do Maven Leaders turn limitations into opportunities?

By Thinking Outside of The Box

Maven Leaders understand how difficult it can be to view the box holding the tacks as anything more than what it was intentionally created for, but they also understand that progress comes from our ability to see the world differently: with 540 Degree Awareness we enable our perceptual recognition, which allows one to explore all of the available options — both orthodox and unorthodox – and then Test for Success.

This approach keeps Maven Leaders focused on the big picture, opposed to obsessing over the details, issues or limitations we are confronted with on a daily basis. That is to say, it allows us to remove the tacks from the box in the early stages of addressing proverbial candle problems — a decision that helps our teams focus on solving problems; and avoid Dying in The Fight.

5 Cheat Codes That Hack Success

From an early age I witnessed the benefits of hard work: Men and women who were dedicated and driven to accomplish goals, which most would assume insurmountable: Individuals who — at the time — seemed to understand a secret or #humancheatcode that allowed them to make the seemingly impossible possible. As I progressed in my career I took with me a few of the lessons learned from these individuals. Lessons that have allowed me to perform at a high level under duress and compete in several different environments.

Cheat Codes

Employ the following human cheat codes to make the seemingly impossible possible:

#AlwaysBeReady

“Success depends upon previous preparation, and without such preparation there is sure to be failure.” — Confucius

The 1st business owner I was recruited by specialized in event management. At the time — in his market — the competition was at a high level and the events management industry was cut throat. Competitors would sabotage your events and at times refuse to honor contractual agreements. Nonetheless, he always managed to stay relevant by planning his every move — with contingencies — in advance.

This high-level of preparation allowed him to pivot and adjust to adverse outcomes faster than the competition.

#RideTheWave

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” — Bert Lance

Often time’s people try to change systems that are already working. The most successful people I have interacted with — recognize a trend and find a way to compliment the things that people are already tuned in to.

I’ve seen people — with a minimal investment — turn lifestyle businesses that complimented a pre-existing trending topic into seven figure brands in less than two years.

#Location 1st

“Real estate is the key cost… That’s why there’s the old saw: location, location, location.” — Jeff Bezos

If you wear your tuxedo to a barbeque you are likely to receive some strange looks, but if you wear the same tux to a black tie event you have primed yourself for a successful evening. In short, your business model has to compliment your markets demand.

When in Rome, live as the Romans do; when elsewhere, live as they live elsewhere.” — Saint Ambrose

The one human cheat code that every one of the aforementioned people I mentioned earlier realize is — that you have to put yourself and your products in the right place to succeed on or offline.

#StayHumbleStayHungry

“Humility is the true key to success. Humble people share the credit and wealth, remaining focused and hungry to continue the journey of success.” — Rick Pitino

I have never run across a truly successful person who didn’t practice dignified humility. All ambitious people are driven, but the most successful people have an unquenchable thirst: A humble hunger which allows them to persevere — even in the most trying of times.

Closed mouths don’t get feed and greedy people generally get excused from the table. Find a balance between the two extremes.

#GiveBack

“As I give, I get.” — Mary McLeod Bethune

The single most successful person I have ever interacted with made it a mission to — help “up and coming” people who were humble enough to listen. From my interaction with this individual I gleaned the reciprocal value of service. On the surface you have an opportunity to assist others, but at the end of the day — the true value comes from what you learn about yourself along the way.

Some of the best ideas in the world came from everyday people who shared an interaction with an influencer.

#Be About It
@darimusBe #AboutIt
Mental: Physical: Financial: Health & Wealth

* If you remember the Video Game Cheat Code Listed 👆🏼 — Leave a Comment!

Lead & Grow Fast with my T.L.R.R. Technique


Learn & Grow Fast

In today’s, fast-paced social media driven environment developing systems to sift through the endless flow of data is a critical factor that can determine your team’s success.

That said, I would like to share a system that has served my teams and I well.

This system encompasses some elements of the scientific method, but is not limited to the aforementioned methodology. I will discuss each section in detail below:


Test

After you have established a hypothesis, concept, playbook or approach that you would like to implement within your organization. It makes sense to test your idea before implementation. Initial test will reveal flaws in your original concept; and in the long run can be the difference between your success and failure.

Take Space X for example. Without completing multiple test to land a rocket ship on a stationary target, the space aviation industry would not have eclipsed the following milestone so rapidly:

(Testing may be expensive and / or time consuming on the front end, but in the long run it is the R&D step which will safeguard your team, products or company from future shock.)


Learn

Consider the test to be the research hand and the lessons learned and results of your testing as a call to action. Consequently, leading to new developments and / or approaches aimed at maximizing your team’s success. Both hands – research & development – will clean up the face of your systems and in turn insure that you are bringing the best plan to the table.

Revise

That said, no matter how thorough your R&D you will be forced to make adjustments. Adjustments that will either fix flawed methodology or take your performance, product or output to a new level.
I recommend revising early and often.


Resubmit

After revisions are complete it is important to bring your efforts to life and further safeguard your team’s growth by making adjustments based upon your findings. Resubmission may seem like “common sense” but often times it is the step neglected while teams balance the implementation and growth of the preexisting system.

Repeat

If you want to take your performance from good to great and foster unstoppable results: You will not rest on your laurels, in turn allowing your organization to embrace the idiom:

The world is growing at a rapid pace and the teams that are willing to keep their eyes facing tomorrow in the face of success. Will be right fitted for change and positioned to lead their industry, league, market or sales channel going forward.

Original Publication: